NHS Tutoring

This is a great opportunity to learn from students who have walked in your shoes.

The NHS - National Honor Society of Atascocita High is holding tutorial sessions for each of the core subject areas after school.

Agenda: Week of Oct. 29 - Nov. 2, 2012

Unit 5: Intelligence, Motivation, and Emotion
Week at a Glance:
Mon - Measuring Intelligence & Factors of Intelligence
Tue - Introduction to Motivation & Emotion, Hunger
Wed/Thu  - Motivation - Theories & Application
Fri - Emotion

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Monday, October 29, 2012
Quote of the Day: “If opportunity doesn't knock, build a door.” - Milton Berle

Learning Targets:

1. Binet created the first intelligence test and developed the concept of mental age, but Terman's revision, the Stanford-Binet, created a way to compute an IQ score.
2. Aptitude tests predict future success and achievement tests assess what individuals already know.
3. When designing tests, psychometricians focus on standardization, reliability, validity, and culture fairness.
4. Normal distributions are bell-shaped curves in which most scores fall near the average and the percentage of scores between standard deviations is fixed by a formula.
5. Reliability refers to a test being repeatable and validity refers to a test being accurate.

- Explain the theories that have been created for understanding intelligence
- Compare the different modes of intelligence testing
- Explain how the range of mental abilities, from creativity and giftedness to mental retardation, can be identified, explained, & understood.


Essential Questions:

- How much of intelligence is inherited, and how much is due to upbringing?
- What exactly is intelligence, and what do test scores mean?
- Why do some people with high IQ scores become underachievers, while others with average IQ scores become leaders? - How does intelligence related to creativity and artistic or athletic abilities?


Agenda:

1. Finish Video from Friday: Einstein Effect.
2. Notes, Video, Discussion: Intelligence - Measurement & Theory
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Tuesday, October 30, 2012
Quote of the Day: ”I haven’t failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” - Thomas Edison

Learning Targets:

A behavior is what we do. Motivation is why we do it. Motivation is a complex combination of needs, drives, incentives, and emotions. 
Emotion involves physiological processes, expressive behaviors, and cognitive appraisal in generating feelings. The basic emotions of joy, anger, fear, and sorrow appear to be universal across cultures. Emotions may play an important role in cognitive functions such as reason and decision making.
1. Human motivation is complex, and while there are a number of theories, none by itself sufficiently explains our behavior.

2. Biological motivation includes the role of the hypothalamus, which maintains a state called homeostasis.
3. Theories of social motivation, including the need for achievement and the hierarchy of needs, show the importance of understanding motivation in the context of our environments.
4. Emotions can be explained through a variety of theoretical perspectives, each arguing that emotion emerges in conjunction with physiological response to stimuli.

Essential Questions:

- How and why people are motivated?
- Analyze the different types of motivation.
- Define the importance characteristics of emotion in human behavior and decision making
We do not know how emotions are generalized. 
Which theory is clearest example in your mind?
James-Lange Theory: We have a psychological response and we label it as an emotion:
"I see a bear, my muscles tense, I feel afraid."
Cannon-Bard Theory: We have an emotional response and we feel the physiological response:
"I see a bear, I feel afraid, my muscles tense."
Schacter-Singer Theory: We experience feelings and then label them:
"I feel bad. I must be scared."
Cognitive Appraisal: When there is no physiological arousal, we experience something; we think about it, we label it as an emotion.

Agenda:
1. Quiz - Intelligence.
2. DO NOW: Pick up article "Why We Eat" from front and begin reading. We will discuss in class on block day.
3. Notes, Video, & Discussion: Motivation through Hunger
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Wednesday, October 31, 2012 --and-- Thursday, November 1, 2012
Quote of the Day: ”It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.” - Aristotle

Learning Targets:

A behavior is what we do. Motivation is why we do it. Motivation is a complex combination of needs, drives, incentives, and emotions.
Emotion involves physiological processes, expressive behaviors, and cognitive appraisal in generating feelings. The basic emotions of joy, anger, fear, and sorrow appear to be universal across cultures. Emotions may play an important role in cognitive functions such as reason and decision making.
1. Human motivation is complex, and while there are a number of theories, none by itself sufficiently explains our behavior.
2. Biological motivation includes the role of the hypothalamus, which maintains a state called homeostasis.
3. Theories of social motivation, including the need for achievement and the hierarchy of needs, show the importance of understanding motivation in the context of our environments.
4. Emotions can be explained through a variety of theoretical perspectives, each arguing that emotion emerges in conjunction with physiological response to stimuli.

Essential Questions:

- How and why people are motivated?
- Analyze the different types of motivation.
- Define the importance characteristics of emotion in human behavior and decision making
We do not know how emotions are generalized. 
Which theory is clearest example in your mind?
James-Lange Theory: We have a psychological response and we label it as an emotion:
"I see a bear, my muscles tense, I feel afraid."
Cannon-Bard Theory: We have an emotional response and we feel the physiological response:
"I see a bear, I feel afraid, my muscles tense."
Schacter-Singer Theory: We experience feelings and then label them:
"I feel bad. I must be scared."
Cognitive Appraisal: When there is no physiological arousal, we experience something; we think about it, we label it as an emotion.

Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: What questions do you have regarding the article: Why We Eat? Be prepared to discuss it in 5 minutes.
2. Socratic Seminar: Discuss the article: Why We Eat?
3. Notes, Video, & Discussion: Motivation.
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Friday, November 2, 2012
Quote of the Day: ”The quickest way to double your money is to fold it over and put it back in your pocket.” - Will Rogers

Learning Targets:

A behavior is what we do. Motivation is why we do it. Motivation is a complex combination of needs, drives, incentives, and emotions.
Emotion involves physiological processes, expressive behaviors, and cognitive appraisal in generating feelings. The basic emotions of joy, anger, fear, and sorrow appear to be universal across cultures. Emotions may play an important role in cognitive functions such as reason and decision making.
1. Human motivation is complex, and while there are a number of theories, none by itself sufficiently explains our behavior.
2. Biological motivation includes the role of the hypothalamus, which maintains a state called homeostasis.
3. Theories of social motivation, including the need for achievement and the hierarchy of needs, show the importance of understanding motivation in the context of our environments.
4. Emotions can be explained through a variety of theoretical perspectives, each arguing that emotion emerges in conjunction with physiological response to stimuli.

Essential Questions:

- How and why people are motivated?
- Analyze the different types of motivation.
- Define the importance characteristics of emotion in human behavior and decision making
We do not know how emotions are generalized.
Which theory is clearest example in your mind?
James-Lange Theory: We have a psychological response and we label it as an emotion:
"I see a bear, my muscles tense, I feel afraid."
Cannon-Bard Theory: We have an emotional response and we feel the physiological response:
"I see a bear, I feel afraid, my muscles tense."
Schacter-Singer Theory: We experience feelings and then label them:
"I feel bad. I must be scared."
Cognitive Appraisal: When there is no physiological arousal, we experience something; we think about it, we label it as an emotion.

Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: Analyze the 4 theories of Emotion. Which seems the clearest to you?
2. Notes, Video, Discussion: Emotion- Theories & Practice.

Quiz on Motivation & Emotion is Monday. Test on Unit 5 - Intelligence, Motivation & Emotion is Tuesday.

Targets, Notes, & Articles for Unit 5 Motivation and Emotion

Click here to view:
Targets for Unit 5 - Motivation & Emotion
Article: American Obesity - Why We Eat
Article: Tired of Feeling Bad - The New Science of Feelings Can Help
Notes: Motivation & Emotion - Part I - Hunger
Notes: Motivation - Theories, Part I - Instinct, Drive Reduction, & Arousal
Notes: Motivation - Theories, Part III - Intrinsic Motivation, Leadership, & Human Sexuality
Notes: Emotion - Theories and Practice, Part IV


AP Testing Info


AP Test:  To sign-up and pay for AP Test go to:
http://aptestservice.com/atascocita

Click on the Link for 'AP' and follow the directions.  
You will find links for AP Exam Information, AP Exam Calendar and Test Regulation. 

AP test are $90 per exam.  There is a $2.75 processing fee to handle your online payment.  The payment site accepts all Credit Cards and Paypal.

You can registrar for all of your test or one at a time.  Please note that the last day to registrar  without a $50 late fee, is March 13th.  You can registrar from March 14th - March 24th with a late fee. For more information, click on the page title AP Testing in the left hand menu.

Students have the option to register one test at a time or all their test at once. The test is still $90 - the other 2.75 is the service charge to process the Paypal or CC purchase - just like Amazon or any other online purchase. If a student is free/reduced there is a waiver that will bring the price down - they must see Ms. Willows, the testing coordinator, to get it. The district has made it almost impossible to take money - This is the only way I can process over 500 test fees.

Notes - Unit 5 - Intelligence

Click to download the Chapter 9 Notes:
Unit 5 Intelligence - Part I: What is Intelligence?
Unit 5 Notes Intelligence - Part II: Are there different forms of intelligence?
Unit 5 Notes Intelligence - Part III: Does intelligence change over time?

Agenda: Week of October 22 through October 26, 2012

Unit 4 Cognition - Memory, Language, & Thought -- Test Monday
Unit 5 Intelligence, Motivation, & Emotion
Week at a Glance:
MON - TEST Unit 4 Cognition.
TUE - Introduction to Intelligence.
W/TH - Intelligence measurements.
FRI - Multiple Intelligences, Stephen Wiltshire - Savant.
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Monday, October 22, 2012
Quote of the Day: "He Who Knows Others Is Wise. He Who Knows Himself Is Enlightened." - Tao Te Ching


Learning Targets for Unit 4 Cognition. 
1. Cognition is the study of mental processes.
2. STM seems to be limited to 7+ - 2 items at any given time.
3. The differences between encoding, storage, and retrieval are important.
4. Models of LTM deal with how we organize information that we need to know.
5. Problem solving involves applying what we know in an organized way to issues that we face.
6. Language is a complex system of communication that allows us to use complex symbols to talk about things in the past or future, not just the present.


Agenda:
1. TEST Unit 4 Cognition.
Stata Center, MIT
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Tuesday, October 25, 2011
Quote of the Day: "Victory is reserved for those who are willing to pay it's price." - Sun Tzu


Learning Targets:
1. Binet created the first intelligence test and developed the concept of mental age, but Terman's revision, the Stanford-Binet, created a way to compute an IQ score.
2. Aptitude tests predict future success and achievement tests assess what individuals already know.
3. When designing tests, psychometricians focus on standardization, reliability, validity, and culture fairness.
4. Normal distributions are bell-shaped curves in which most scores fall near the average and the percentage of scores between standard deviations is fixed by a formula.
5. Reliability refers to a test being repeatable and validity refers to a test being accurate. 

- Explain the theories that have been created for understanding intelligence
- Compare the different modes of intelligence testing
- Explain how the range of mental abilities, from creativity and giftedness to mental retardation, can be identified, explained, & understood.


Essential Questions:
- How much of intelligence is inherited, and how much is due to upbringing?
- What exactly is intelligence, and what do test scores mean?
- Why do some people with high IQ scores become underachievers, while others with average IQ scores become leaders? - How does intelligence related to creativity and artistic or athletic abilities?
Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: "Write down the names of the 3 "smartest" people that you know. What makes them so?"
2. Notes, Video, Discussion: Introduction to Intelligence. "What is Smart?" Nature vs. Nurture. Intelligence Testing.
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Wednesday, October 26 and Thursday October 27, 2011
Quote of the Day: "When the pupil is ready to learn, a teacher will appear." -  Zen Proverb


Learning Targets:
1. Binet created the first intelligence test and developed the concept of mental age, but Terman's revision, the Stanford-Binet, created a way to compute an IQ score.
2. Aptitude tests predict future success and achievement tests assess what individuals already know.
3. When designing tests, psychometricians focus on standardization, reliability, validity, and culture fairness.
4. Normal distributions are bell-shaped curves in which most scores fall near the average and the percentage of scores between standard deviations is fixed by a formula.
5. Reliability refers to a test being repeatable and validity refers to a test being accurate. 

- Explain the theories that have been created for understanding intelligence
- Compare the different modes of intelligence testing
- Explain how the range of mental abilities, from creativity and giftedness to mental retardation, can be identified, explained, & understood.


Essential Questions:
- How much of intelligence is inherited, and how much is due to upbringing?
- What exactly is intelligence, and what do test scores mean?
- Why do some people with high IQ scores become underachievers, while others with average IQ scores become leaders? - How does intelligence related to creativity and artistic or athletic abilities?


Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: IQ Tests have shown to be good indicators of school performance. Why?
2. Notes, Video, & Discussion: History & Development of IQ Testing.
3. Video with questions & Discussion: Beautiful Minds: The Einstein Effect. Link to video & Questions here.
An amazing video! 
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Friday, October 28, 2011
Quote of the Day:  "We are shaped by our thoughts; we become what we think. When the mind is pure, joy follows like a shadow that never leaves." - Buddha


Learning Targets:
1. Binet created the first intelligence test and developed the concept of mental age, but Terman's revision, the Stanford-Binet, created a way to compute an IQ score.
2. Aptitude tests predict future success and achievement tests assess what individuals already know.
3. When designing tests, psychometricians focus on standardization, reliability, validity, and culture fairness.
4. Normal distributions are bell-shaped curves in which most scores fall near the average and the percentage of scores between standard deviations is fixed by a formula.
5. Reliability refers to a test being repeatable and validity refers to a test being accurate. 

- Explain the theories that have been created for understanding intelligence
- Compare the different modes of intelligence testing
- Explain how the range of mental abilities, from creativity and giftedness to mental retardation, can be identified, explained, & understood.


Essential Questions:
- How much of intelligence is inherited, and how much is due to upbringing?
- What exactly is intelligence, and what do test scores mean?
- Why do some people with high IQ scores become underachievers, while others with average IQ scores become leaders? - How does intelligence related to creativity and artistic or athletic abilities?


Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: Is intelligence one thing or several different abilities?
2. Notes, Video, & Discussion: Theories of Intelligence.
We will watch the video clip on Stephen Wiltshire: Savant.

Video & Questions for Beautiful Minds: The Einstein Effect

Questions for the video Beautiful Minds: The Einstein Effect

A fascinating look at the relationship between genius and autism, with particular focus on the phenomenon of savants; a small group of enigmatic talents with extraordinary mental abilities.

Savants number less than 100 worldwide. Some can work out five-digit multiplication in their heads, or recite thousands of books by heart. Others can play a piano melody after hearing it only once. Over half of savants are autistic; others develop these super human talents only after brain injury.

With scientists now able to see billions of neurons at work in the brain, experts are now investigating whether it is in fact a defect that turns a person into a genius. Could the giant minds of the past – from Newton, to Mozart, to Albert Einstein have been autistic?

YouTube: Beautiful Minds - The Einstein Effect

Targets: Unit 5 Intelligence & Motivation

Click below to download the Learning Targets: Unit 5 Intelligence, Motivation, & Emotion
Targets for Intelligence
Targets for Motivation & Emotion

Pinker on Linquistics as a window to understand the brain

This is a truly fascinating video. One that is hard to believe is freely available to view. If you are having difficulty with Cognition: Language. Definitely watch this. It is so well explained. He breaks it all down for you. Great examples, graphical display, and all done in a clear and logical fashion.

Interested in being a Psych major in college? Well, what are you waiting for??? Watch this video.

Bravo Mr. Pinker!

Click here to view the video on Youtube: Steven Pinker: Linguistics as a window to understand the brain


Alumni Focus - Bike MS Alamo Ride


This week's inspiration is a personal one because it has inspired me! 

I have two former students Celeste Garza and Kandice Melchor who road this weekend in the Bike MS: Valero 2012 Alamo Ride to the River. The ride is very much like the MS 150 that goes from Houston to Austin

Celeste and Kandice met with me this summer and explained that they wanted to ride in my name for Bike MS. They were inspired to do something positive (and get in great shape at the same time!). At the time I was having a pretty great summer and feeling well. But, this weekend has probably been the hardest I have had since sometime early last spring. My MS has been really raging and spiking on me. 

Seeing the news that they had both finished today really picked up my spirits! They are awesome.



Notes - Unit 4 - Cognition - Memory, Language, & Thought

Click to download:
Psych Notes Unit 4 - Cognition: Memory
Psych Notes Unit 4 - Cognition: Language & Thought
Psych Notes Unit 4 - Cognition: Language Influence on Thought
Psych Notes Unit 4 - Cognition at Work - Problem Solving & Behavior

Agenda: Week of October 15 - 19, 2012

Unit 4 - Cognition: Memory, Language, & Thought

Week at a Glance:
MON - Finish Memory, Introduce Language & Thought -- Communication TUE - Quiz Unit 4, Language & Thought -- Acquisition, Human Nature
WED/THU - Language, Thought, & Problem Solving (Cognition)
FRI - TEST Unit 4
Monday, Oct. 15, 2012
Quote of the Day"If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough." - Albert Einstein

Learning Targets for Unit 4
1. Cognition is the study of mental processes.
2. STM seems to be limited to 7+ - 2 items at any given time.
3. The differences between encoding, storage, and retrieval are important.
4. Models of LTM deal with how we organize information that we need to know.
5. Problem solving involves applying what we know in an organized way to issues that we face.
6. Language is a complex system of communication that allows us to use complex symbols to talk about things in the past or future, not just the present.


Essential Questions
1. How do humans acquire language?
2. What are the milestones to human language development?
3. How would being bilingual influence your ability to think and use the cognitive process?
4. Which theory makes more sense to you: Chomsky (ability to speak is hard wired universal to humans - "language box") or Pinker (instinct/biological adaptation)?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW Question: "Curious blue ideas sleep furiously." - At what level is that statement ambiguous?
2. Video (finish what is left for each class): 
Video Study: 60 Minutes Endless Memory
Video: Endless Memory, 60 Minutes, Part I
Video: Endless Memory, 60 Minutes, Part II

3. Notes, Discussion, Video: How do we use cognition, memory, language, & thought to COMMUNICATE?
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012
Quote of the Day"Art works because it appeals to certain faculties of the mind. Music depends on details of the auditory system, painting and sculpture on the visual system. Poetry and literature depend on language." - Steven Pinker  

Learning Targets for Unit 4
1. Cognition is the study of mental processes.
2. STM seems to be limited to 7+ - 2 items at any given time.
3. The differences between encoding, storage, and retrieval are important.
4. Models of LTM deal with how we organize information that we need to know.
5. Problem solving involves applying what we know in an organized way to issues that we face.
6. Language is a complex system of communication that allows us to use complex symbols to talk about things in the past or future, not just the present.


Essential Questions
1. How does language influence thought?
2. How can language reveal information to us about human nature?

Agenda:
1. Quiz - Unit 4
2. Do Now Question (after quiz): How does language influence thought?
2. Notes, Discussion, Video & Introduction: How does language influence thought? (Part II)
Video: Pinker language is a window into the mind. 7:23

Video: Steven Pinker Believes Language Reveals Human Nature, 27 minutes

Wednesday, Oct. 17 & Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012
Quote of the Day“Our comforting conviction that the world makes sense rests on a secure foundation: our almost unlimited ability to ignore our ignorance.” — Daniel Kahneman

Learning Targets for Unit 4
1. Cognition is the study of mental processes.
2. STM seems to be limited to 7+ - 2 items at any given time.
3. The differences between encoding, storage, and retrieval are important.
4. Models of LTM deal with how we organize information that we need to know.
5. Problem solving involves applying what we know in an organized way to issues that we face.
6. Language is a complex system of communication that allows us to use complex symbols to talk about things in the past or future, not just the present.


Essential Questions
1. Can a person 'think' without using language?
2. What are the four main strategies to problem solving?
3. How does the work of Kahneman and Tversky demonstrate that people's attitudes toward risks concerning gains may be quite different from their attitudes toward risks concerning losses.

Agenda:
1. Do Now Question:  Can you "think" without language? If so, how?
2. Notes, Video, Discussion: Language & Thought, Pt. 3: Cognition at Work
Video Clip: Video: 60 Minutes "Secret Language of Elephants" 14:19
How do scientists study animal behavior to effectively understand human behavior?
Link to video on YouTube: TedTalk Daniel Kahneman - "Our Experiencing Selves" Using examples from vacations to colonoscopies, Nobel laureate and founder of behavioral economics Daniel Kahneman reveals how our "experiencing selves" and our "remembering selves" perceive happiness differently. What does Kahneman say the ideal length of a vacation would be?


Friday, Oct. 19, 2012
Quote of the Day"I am learning all the time.  The tombstone will be my diploma."  - Eartha Kitt

Learning Targets for Unit 4
1. Cognition is the study of mental processes.
2. STM seems to be limited to 7+ - 2 items at any given time.
3. The differences between encoding, storage, and retrieval are important.
4. Models of LTM deal with how we organize information that we need to know.
5. Problem solving involves applying what we know in an organized way to issues that we face.
6. Language is a complex system of communication that allows us to use complex symbols to talk about things in the past or future, not just the present.

Essential Questions

Agenda:
1. TEST Unit 4

Agenda: Week of Monday, Oct. 8 - Friday, Oct. 12, 2012

Unit 4 - Cognition - Memory, Language, & Thought
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Week At A Glance:
MON - No School. Columbus Day. Beat the Jets!
TUE - Introduction to Cognition & Memory
WED/THU - How Memory Works, Article Study: Friends Ruin Memory
FRI - Article Flavor of Memories; Cognition: Language Acquisition.
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Monday, October 8, 2012
Quote of the Day: “I understand that it's rare in this league to go un-drafted and perform at the level that I did. What people don't understand is that it didn't just happen. I worked day and night at my craft.” - Arian Foster, #23, Houston Texans, RB. 
Agenda:
1. Beat the Jets! 
Columbus Day - No School.
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Tuesday, October 9, 2012
Quote of the Day: "You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him." - James D. Mills

Learning Targets:
1. Cognition is the study of mental processes.
2. STM seems to be limited to 7+ - 2 items at any given time.
3. The differences between encoding, storage, and retrieval are important.
4. Models of LTM deal with how we organize information that we need to know.

Essential Questions:
1. Explain the elements of the cognitive process.
2. Explain how human memory functions and analyze why remembering everything would not be an advantage.

Agenda:
1. FIRST - Prepare FRQ to be turned into Mr. Duez. He will walk around and pick them up.
DO NOW: "Cognition Test" -- What is the best thing you ever ate? Explain every detail that you can remember about that meal, dish, or type of food. Write it down. You have 5 minutes.
2. Introduction to Cognition: Notes, Discussion, & Video: Unit 4 Notes Cognition
3. "The Woman Who Could Not Forget" 
Video Study: 60 Minutes Endless Memory
Video: Endless Memory, 60 Minutes, Part I
Video: Endless Memory, 60 Minutes, Part II
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Wednesday, October 10, 2012 & Thursday, October 11, 2012
Quote of the Day:  "History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, need not be lived again."  - Maya Angelou 


Learning Targets:
1. Cognition is the study of mental processes.
2. STM seems to be limited to 7+ - 2 items at any given time.
3. The differences between encoding, storage, and retrieval are important.
4. Models of LTM deal with how we organize information that we need to know.
5. Problem solving involves applying what we know in an organized way to issues that we face.
6. Language is a complex system of communication that allows us to use complex symbols to talk about things in the past or future, not just the present.

Essential Questions:
1. How does short term, long term, encoding, storage, and retrieval help humans remember events?
2. What are some obstacles to having an accurate memory?
3. Explain the Theory - Model of Information Processing (Atkinson-Shiffrin).

Agenda:

1. Pick up the How Friends Ruin Memory, read it in class for the first 15 minutes. We will discuss in a Socratic Seminar to begin the period.
2. Finish "Endless Memory" video if needed.
3. Notes, Video, & Discussion: Unit 4 Notes Cognition
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Friday, October 12, 2012
Quote of the Day: "Tension is who you think you should be. Relaxation is who you are." - Chinese proverb

Learning Targets:

1. Cognition is the study of mental processes.
2. STM seems to be limited to 7+ - 2 items at any given time.
3. The differences between encoding, storage, and retrieval are important.
4. Models of LTM deal with how we organize information that we need to know.
5. Problem solving involves applying what we know in an organized way to issues that we face.
6. Language is a complex system of communication that allows us to use complex symbols to talk about things in the past or future, not just the present.

Essential Questions:
1. How does language influence our ability to remember, think, learn, and make decisions?
2. What are Pinker and Chomsky's views on Language Acquisition?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: Pick up article: Flavor of Memories  Spend the first 10 minutes reading and annotating the article. We will review it in class on Monday.
Discuss Pinker and Chomsky's theories on Language acquisition.

QUIZ ON TUESDAY over Cognition: Memory, Language, & Thought