Agenda: Nov 3 - November 7, 2014

Advanced Placement PSYCHOLOGY with Mr. Duez
Unit 4 -  Cognition: Memory, Language, & Thought + Intelligence
Unit 5 - Motivation/Emotion, Stress, Development
WEEK AT A GLANCE:
MON:
Intelligence: Forms; Does intelligence change over time?
TUE: TEST UNIT 4 - Cognition: Memory, Language, & Thought + Intelligence
WED/THU: Philosophical Chairs: Development & Motivation Topics; Introduction to Motivation & Emotion
FRI: Motivation: Theories; Crash Course Psychology
Depends on crystallized or fluid intelligence. Crystallized is pretty much set by age 3!
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Monday, Nov 3, 2014
Quote:  “The test we must set for ourselves is not to march alone but to march in such a way that others wish to join us.” - Hubert Humphrey

Learning Targets:
1. Binet created the first intelligence test and developed the concept of mental age, but Terman's revision, the Stanford-Binet, created a way to compute an IQ score.
2. Aptitude tests predict future success and achievement tests assess what individuals already know.
3. When designing tests, psychometricians focus on standardization, reliability, validity, and culture fairness.
4. Normal distributions are bell-shaped curves in which most scores fall near the average and the percentage of scores between standard deviations is fixed by a formula.
5. Reliability refers to a test being repeatable and validity refers to a test being accurate.
- Explain the theories that have been created for understanding intelligence
- Compare the different modes of intelligence testing
- Explain how the range of mental abilities, from creativity and giftedness to mental retardation, can be identified, explained, & understood.

Essential Questions:
- How much of intelligence is inherited, and how much is due to upbringing?
- What exactly is intelligence, and what do test scores mean?
- Why do some people with high IQ scores become underachievers, while others with average IQ scores become leaders? - How does intelligence related to creativity and artistic or athletic abilities?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Does intelligence change over time? If not, why? If so, how much?
Assignments:
Test is Tuesday over Unit 4: Cognition: Memory, Language, & Thought + Intelligence
Study the notes, target sheets, and read the text.
The "Living Camera" Stephen Wiltshire and his amazing ability to draw!
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Tuesday, Nov 4, 2014
Quote:  “An excuse is worse and more terrible than a lie, for an excuse is a lie guarded.” - Pope John Paul I

Learning Targets:
1. Binet created the first intelligence test and developed the concept of mental age, but Terman's revision, the Stanford-Binet, created a way to compute an IQ score.
2. Aptitude tests predict future success and achievement tests assess what individuals already know.
3. When designing tests, psychometricians focus on standardization, reliability, validity, and culture fairness.
4. Normal distributions are bell-shaped curves in which most scores fall near the average and the percentage of scores between standard deviations is fixed by a formula.
5. Reliability refers to a test being repeatable and validity refers to a test being accurate.
- Explain the theories that have been created for understanding intelligence
- Compare the different modes of intelligence testing
- Explain how the range of mental abilities, from creativity and giftedness to mental retardation, can be identified, explained, & understood.

Essential Questions:
- How much of intelligence is inherited, and how much is due to upbringing?
- What exactly is intelligence, and what do test scores mean?
- Why do some people with high IQ scores become underachievers, while others with average IQ scores become leaders? - How does intelligence related to creativity and artistic or athletic abilities?

Agenda:
1. TEST UNIT 4 Cognition: Memory, Language, & Thought + Intelligence
2. After test, pick up targets for Unit 5: Motivation & Emotion
and the article: Why We Eat - which is due on Friday in class.

Assignments:
Work on the targets for Unit 5: Motivation & Emotion
and the article: Why We Eat - which is due on Friday in class
We often use eating to explain human motivation in Psychology.
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Wednesday, Nov 5, 2014 and Thursday, Nov 6 2014
Quote: “Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.” - Waldo Emerson

Learning Targets:
Motivation: It is the drive to begin or maintain behavior.

If you learn only 5 things from this Unit...
1. Human motivation is complex, and while there are a number of theories, none by itself sufficiently explains our behavior.
2. Biological motivation includes the role of the hypothalamus, which maintains a state called homeostasis.
3. Theories of social motivation, including the need for achievement and the hierarchy of needs, show the importance of understanding motivation in the context of our environments.
4. Emotions can be explained through a variety of theoretical perspectives, each arguing that emotion emerges in conjunction with physiological response to stimuli.

Learning Objectives:
- How and why people are motivated?
- Different types of motivation
- The importance of emotion in human behavior

Agenda:
1. Do Now:  
Does the size of family matter to the development of a child? 
Are only children more likely to be less social, less intelligent, and overall be less developed than children from bigger families?
2. Philosophical Chairs Discussion: We will choose a question (possibly from the ones in the Do Now) and then spend 20 minutes on a PChairs discussion.
3. Introduction to Motivation & Emotion, Notes/Video/Discussion: 
Video: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
Notes: Motivation & Emotion - Motivation Explained through Hunger

Assignments:
Prepare by reading the notes
Work on the targets for Unit 5: Motivation & Emotion
and the article: Why We Eat - which is due on Friday in class
That Ralston guy did what... really? Wow!
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Friday, Nov 7, 2014
Quote: “Don’t wish it were easier, wish you were better. Don’t wish for fewer problems, wish for more skills. Don’t wish for less challenges, wish for more wisdom.” - Earl Shoaf

If you learn only 5 things from this Unit...
1. Human motivation is complex, and while there are a number of theories, none by itself sufficiently explains our behavior.
2. Biological motivation includes the role of the hypothalamus, which maintains a state called homeostasis.
3. Theories of social motivation, including the need for achievement and the hierarchy of needs, show the importance of understanding motivation in the context of our environments.
4. Emotions can be explained through a variety of theoretical perspectives, each arguing that emotion emerges in conjunction with physiological response to stimuli.

Learning Objectives:
- How and why people are motivated?
- Different types of motivation
- The importance of emotion in human behavior

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Prep the article "Why We Eat" to be turned in to Mr. Duez
2. Crash Course Psychology: The Power of Motivation
Feeling motivated? Even if you are, do you know why? The story of Aaron Ralston can tell us a lot about motivation. In this episode of Crash Course Psychology, Hank tells us Ralston's story, as well as 4 theories of motivation and some evolutionary perspectives on motivation. 

Assignments:
Prepare by reading the notes
Work on the targets for Unit 5: Motivation & Emotion