Agenda: Nov 3 - November 7, 2014

Advanced Placement PSYCHOLOGY with Mr. Duez
Unit 4 -  Cognition: Memory, Language, & Thought + Intelligence
Unit 5 - Motivation/Emotion, Stress, Development
WEEK AT A GLANCE:
MON:
Intelligence: Forms; Does intelligence change over time?
TUE: TEST UNIT 4 - Cognition: Memory, Language, & Thought + Intelligence
WED/THU: Philosophical Chairs: Development & Motivation Topics; Introduction to Motivation & Emotion
FRI: Motivation: Theories; Crash Course Psychology
Depends on crystallized or fluid intelligence. Crystallized is pretty much set by age 3!
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Monday, Nov 3, 2014
Quote:  “The test we must set for ourselves is not to march alone but to march in such a way that others wish to join us.” - Hubert Humphrey

Learning Targets:
1. Binet created the first intelligence test and developed the concept of mental age, but Terman's revision, the Stanford-Binet, created a way to compute an IQ score.
2. Aptitude tests predict future success and achievement tests assess what individuals already know.
3. When designing tests, psychometricians focus on standardization, reliability, validity, and culture fairness.
4. Normal distributions are bell-shaped curves in which most scores fall near the average and the percentage of scores between standard deviations is fixed by a formula.
5. Reliability refers to a test being repeatable and validity refers to a test being accurate.
- Explain the theories that have been created for understanding intelligence
- Compare the different modes of intelligence testing
- Explain how the range of mental abilities, from creativity and giftedness to mental retardation, can be identified, explained, & understood.

Essential Questions:
- How much of intelligence is inherited, and how much is due to upbringing?
- What exactly is intelligence, and what do test scores mean?
- Why do some people with high IQ scores become underachievers, while others with average IQ scores become leaders? - How does intelligence related to creativity and artistic or athletic abilities?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Does intelligence change over time? If not, why? If so, how much?
Assignments:
Test is Tuesday over Unit 4: Cognition: Memory, Language, & Thought + Intelligence
Study the notes, target sheets, and read the text.
The "Living Camera" Stephen Wiltshire and his amazing ability to draw!
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Tuesday, Nov 4, 2014
Quote:  “An excuse is worse and more terrible than a lie, for an excuse is a lie guarded.” - Pope John Paul I

Learning Targets:
1. Binet created the first intelligence test and developed the concept of mental age, but Terman's revision, the Stanford-Binet, created a way to compute an IQ score.
2. Aptitude tests predict future success and achievement tests assess what individuals already know.
3. When designing tests, psychometricians focus on standardization, reliability, validity, and culture fairness.
4. Normal distributions are bell-shaped curves in which most scores fall near the average and the percentage of scores between standard deviations is fixed by a formula.
5. Reliability refers to a test being repeatable and validity refers to a test being accurate.
- Explain the theories that have been created for understanding intelligence
- Compare the different modes of intelligence testing
- Explain how the range of mental abilities, from creativity and giftedness to mental retardation, can be identified, explained, & understood.

Essential Questions:
- How much of intelligence is inherited, and how much is due to upbringing?
- What exactly is intelligence, and what do test scores mean?
- Why do some people with high IQ scores become underachievers, while others with average IQ scores become leaders? - How does intelligence related to creativity and artistic or athletic abilities?

Agenda:
1. TEST UNIT 4 Cognition: Memory, Language, & Thought + Intelligence
2. After test, pick up targets for Unit 5: Motivation & Emotion
and the article: Why We Eat - which is due on Friday in class.

Assignments:
Work on the targets for Unit 5: Motivation & Emotion
and the article: Why We Eat - which is due on Friday in class
We often use eating to explain human motivation in Psychology.
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Wednesday, Nov 5, 2014 and Thursday, Nov 6 2014
Quote: “Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.” - Waldo Emerson

Learning Targets:
Motivation: It is the drive to begin or maintain behavior.

If you learn only 5 things from this Unit...
1. Human motivation is complex, and while there are a number of theories, none by itself sufficiently explains our behavior.
2. Biological motivation includes the role of the hypothalamus, which maintains a state called homeostasis.
3. Theories of social motivation, including the need for achievement and the hierarchy of needs, show the importance of understanding motivation in the context of our environments.
4. Emotions can be explained through a variety of theoretical perspectives, each arguing that emotion emerges in conjunction with physiological response to stimuli.

Learning Objectives:
- How and why people are motivated?
- Different types of motivation
- The importance of emotion in human behavior

Agenda:
1. Do Now:  
Does the size of family matter to the development of a child? 
Are only children more likely to be less social, less intelligent, and overall be less developed than children from bigger families?
2. Philosophical Chairs Discussion: We will choose a question (possibly from the ones in the Do Now) and then spend 20 minutes on a PChairs discussion.
3. Introduction to Motivation & Emotion, Notes/Video/Discussion: 
Video: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
Notes: Motivation & Emotion - Motivation Explained through Hunger

Assignments:
Prepare by reading the notes
Work on the targets for Unit 5: Motivation & Emotion
and the article: Why We Eat - which is due on Friday in class
That Ralston guy did what... really? Wow!
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Friday, Nov 7, 2014
Quote: “Don’t wish it were easier, wish you were better. Don’t wish for fewer problems, wish for more skills. Don’t wish for less challenges, wish for more wisdom.” - Earl Shoaf

If you learn only 5 things from this Unit...
1. Human motivation is complex, and while there are a number of theories, none by itself sufficiently explains our behavior.
2. Biological motivation includes the role of the hypothalamus, which maintains a state called homeostasis.
3. Theories of social motivation, including the need for achievement and the hierarchy of needs, show the importance of understanding motivation in the context of our environments.
4. Emotions can be explained through a variety of theoretical perspectives, each arguing that emotion emerges in conjunction with physiological response to stimuli.

Learning Objectives:
- How and why people are motivated?
- Different types of motivation
- The importance of emotion in human behavior

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Prep the article "Why We Eat" to be turned in to Mr. Duez
2. Crash Course Psychology: The Power of Motivation
Feeling motivated? Even if you are, do you know why? The story of Aaron Ralston can tell us a lot about motivation. In this episode of Crash Course Psychology, Hank tells us Ralston's story, as well as 4 theories of motivation and some evolutionary perspectives on motivation. 

Assignments:
Prepare by reading the notes
Work on the targets for Unit 5: Motivation & Emotion

Agenda: Week of Oct 27 - Oct 31, 2014

Advanced Placement Psychology with Mr. Duez
Unit 4 - Memory, Language & Thought, and Intelligence
WEEK AT A GLANCE:
MON -  Turn in take home FRQ1; Memory: Superior Autobiographical Memory
TUE - Cognition: Language & Thought; How Language Impacts Thought; Cognition at Work
WED/THU - Introduction to Intelligence: Individual Differences & Testing; Savants Video
FRI - Quiz Unit 4; Crash Course Psychology Intelligence
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Monday, Oct. 27, 2014
Quote: "He Who Knows Others Is Wise. He Who Knows Himself Is Enlightened." - Tao Te Ching

Happy Birthday Aidan Ichiro Duez - 10 Years Old. 
The Xbox One - yeah, he's a spoiled kid. But, he's pretty awesome.
Learning Targets:
1. Cognition is the study of mental processes.
2. STM seems to be limited to 7+ - 2 items at any given time.
3. The differences between encoding, storage, and retrieval are important.
4. Models of LTM deal with how we organize information that we need to know.
5. Problem solving involves applying what we know in an organized way to issues that we face.
6. Language is a complex system of communication that allows us to use complex symbols to talk about things in the past or future, not just the present.

Essential Questions:
1. Explain the Theory - Model of Information Processing (Atkinson-Shiffrin).  
2. How does encoding, storage, and retrieval work in the memory process?
3. Explain the functions and processing of the brain when remembering.
4. What 4 key methods of problem solving does psychology focus on and compare each process.
5. How do humans learn language acquisition?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: S.A.M. Memory Wizards: What is different about a person's brain that could allow them to remember such accurate detail about their life?

**AP PSYCH - TURN IN THE FRQ** take home due on Monday, Oct. 27

2. Notes, Video, Discussion: Memory: Structure & Function:
Can memory be improved? (Super Autobiographical Memory - what is up with that? What can we learn from these amazing brains?)
How does a memory form in the brain? (Watch the memory & thought light up in an MRI. It's all about the neurons baby.)
What happens when things go wrong with memory? (Clive Wearing's Story)
Anterograde Amnesia: loss of the ability to create new memories after the event that caused the amnesia, leading to a partial or complete inability to recall the recent past, while long-term memories from before the event remain intact.
Retrograde Amnesia: Most memories created prior to the event are lost while new memories can still be created.

Video: 
Clive Wearing - The man with no short term memory
Clive Wearing - His wife explains what it is like to have no short term memory and Clive's diary

Assignments:
Read the chapter, review the Target Sheet, check out PsychTrek, & take notes to study for test & use on the quiz. Quiz is Friday & Test over Unit 4 is next Tues.
Unit 4 is Memory, Language & Thought, and Intelligence.
Dumbledore has never looked so good! ;-)
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Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014
Quote: "I haven’t failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” - Thomas Edison

Learning Targets:
1. Cognition is the study of mental processes.
2. STM seems to be limited to 7+ - 2 items at any given time.
3. The differences between encoding, storage, and retrieval are important.
4. Models of LTM deal with how we organize information that we need to know.
5. Problem solving involves applying what we know in an organized way to issues that we face.
6. Language is a complex system of communication that allows us to use complex symbols to talk about things in the past or future, not just the present.

Essential Questions:
1. Explain the Theory - Model of Information Processing (Atkinson-Shiffrin).  
2. How does encoding, storage, and retrieval work in the memory process?
3. Explain the functions and processing of the brain when remembering.
4. What 4 key methods of problem solving does psychology focus on and compare each process.
5. How do humans learn language acquisition?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: at what level are these statements ambiguous?
"Curious blue ideas sleep furiously." 
"What is the opposite of a duck?"
"How much does Thursday weigh?"
"Have you stopped beating your pet?"
2. Notes & Discussion: Language & Communication

Assignments:
Read the chapter, review the Target Sheet, check out PsychTrek, & take notes to study for test & use on the quiz.
Quiz is Friday & Test over Unit 4 is next Tues.
Unit 4 is Memory, Language & Thought, and Intelligence.
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Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014 - and - Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014
Quote: ”It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.” - Aristotle

Learning Targets:
1. Binet created the first intelligence test and developed the concept of mental age, but Terman's revision, the Stanford-Binet, created a way to compute an IQ score.
2. Aptitude tests predict future success and achievement tests assess what individuals already know.
3. When designing tests, psychometricians focus on standardization, reliability, validity, and culture fairness.
4. Normal distributions are bell-shaped curves in which most scores fall near the average and the percentage of scores between standard deviations is fixed by a formula.
5. Reliability refers to a test being repeatable and validity refers to a test being accurate.
- Explain the theories that have been created for understanding intelligence
- Compare the different modes of intelligence testing
- Explain how the range of mental abilities, from creativity and giftedness to mental retardation, can be identified, explained, & understood.

Essential Questions:
- How much of intelligence is inherited, and how much is due to upbringing?
- What exactly is intelligence, and what do test scores mean?
- Why do some people with high IQ scores become underachievers, while others with average IQ scores become leaders? - How does intelligence related to creativity and artistic or athletic abilities?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Who are the 3 smartest people that you know? What makes them "smart"?
2. Notes, Video, Discussion: Intro to Intelligence
3. Video Study with Notes & Discussion: Beautiful Minds: The Einstein Effect. Link to video & Questions here.
4. Notes, Discussion: Does Intelligence Change Over Time?

Assignments:
Read the chapter, review the Target Sheet, check out PsychTrek, & take notes to study for test & use on the quiz. Quiz is Friday & Test over Unit 4 is next Tues.
Unit 4 is Memory, Language & Thought, and Intelligence.
Halloween - 2011. A Harry Potter fest.
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Friday, Oct. 31, 2014
Quote: “If opportunity doesn't knock, build a door.” - Milton Berle

Learning Targets:
1. Binet created the first intelligence test and developed the concept of mental age, but Terman's revision, the Stanford-Binet, created a way to compute an IQ score.
2. Aptitude tests predict future success and achievement tests assess what individuals already know.
3. When designing tests, psychometricians focus on standardization, reliability, validity, and culture fairness.
4. Normal distributions are bell-shaped curves in which most scores fall near the average and the percentage of scores between standard deviations is fixed by a formula.
5. Reliability refers to a test being repeatable and validity refers to a test being accurate.
- Explain the theories that have been created for understanding intelligence
- Compare the different modes of intelligence testing
- Explain how the range of mental abilities, from creativity and giftedness to mental retardation, can be identified, explained, & understood.

Essential Questions:
- How much of intelligence is inherited, and how much is due to upbringing?
- What exactly is intelligence, and what do test scores mean?
- Why do some people with high IQ scores become underachievers, while others with average IQ scores become leaders? - How does intelligence related to creativity and artistic or athletic abilities?

Agenda:
1. Reading Check Quiz - Unit 4
2. Video: Crash Course Psychology: Controversy of Intelligence #23 So, how many different kinds of intelligence are there? And what is the G-Factor? Eugenics? Have you ever taken an IQ Test? All of these things play into the fascinating and sometimes icky history of Intelligence Testing. In this episode of Crash Course Psychology, Hank talks us through some of the important aspects of that history... as well as Nazis. Hey, I said some of it was icky. (Defining Intelligence, Types, G-Factor, Sherlock Holmes, Intelligence Testing, IQ Scores, Eugenics, Intelligence Controversy)

Assignments:
Read the chapter, review the Target Sheet, check out PsychTrek, & take notes to study for test & use on the quiz.
Test over Unit 4 is next Tues.
Unit 4 is Memory, Language & Thought, and Intelligence.

Agenda: Week of Oct. 20 - Oct. 24, 2014

Advanced Placement Psychology with Mr. Duez
Unit 3 - Consciousness & Learning
and
Unit 4 - Cognition: Memory, Language/Thought, & Intelligence
WEEK AT A GLANCE:
MON - Quiz Unit 3; Review Quiz; Discuss Operant Conditioning
TUE - TEST - Unit 3
WED/THUArticle - due at the beginning of the next class: How Friends Ruin Memory; Introduction to Unit 4: Cognition; How to write the AP Psych FRQ Essay; Introduce first prompt, take home due on Monday, Oct. 27
FRI - Finish Superior Autobiographical Memory; Short-term & Long-term Memory; Atkinson-Shiffrin Model.
Yeah, it's kinda like Big Bang Theory!
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Monday, Oct. 20, 2014
Quote: "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough." - Albert Einstein

Learning Targets:
1. Learning refers to a relatively permanent change in behavior based on experience.
2. Classical conditioning involves the pairing of one stimulus with another, so that eventually the first neutral stimulus will evoke a reflex.
3. Classical conditioning is associated with Pavlov and WatsonOperant conditioning is associated with Skinner.
4. According to Operant Conditioning, the consequences of a behavior influence whether or not the behavior will be performed again.
5. Reinforcements are used to increase the likelihood a behavior will be repeated
6. Punishments are used to decrease the likelihood a behavior will be repeated.


Essential Questions:

Compare Classical Conditioning and Operant Conditioning.
What is the difference between a reinforcement and punishment?
How do positive and negative types of reinforcement and punishment differ from one another?


Agenda:
1. Reading Check Quiz - Unit 3 
2. Review the Quiz. After quiz - How does Classical & Operant Conditioning Differ?
3. Notes, Discussion, Video: Operant Conditioning.
How is Classical Conditioning different from Operant Conditioning?
Pavlov - Dogs
Watson - Baby Albert
Thorndike - Cats
Skinner - Rats
Shaping, Reinforcement, Schedules of Conditioning

Assignments:

Check the notes, YouTube lectures, and work on the Target Sheets to prepare
Mmmmmm, now I want Tacos!
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Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014
Quote: "Art works because it appeals to certain faculties of the mind. Music depends on details of the auditory system, painting and sculpture on the visual system. Poetry and literature depend on language." - Steven Pinker

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Prep for Test - Unit 3 Consciousness & Learning
2. TEST UNIT 3 
3. Pick up Article - due at the beginning of the next class: How Friends Ruin Memory.
4. Introduce first prompt, take home due on Monday, Oct. 27

Assignments:

Article - due at the beginning of the next class: How Friends Ruin Memory.
Check the notes, YouTube lectures, and work on the Target Sheets to prepare
FRQ Essay take home due on Monday, Oct. 27
WHO ATE THE DAMN PIZZA ROLLS?
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Wednesday, Oct. 22 & Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014
Quote: “Our comforting conviction that the world makes sense rests on a secure foundation: our almost unlimited ability to ignore our ignorance.” - Daniel Kahneman

Learning Targets:
1. Cognition is the study of mental processes.
2. STM seems to be limited to 7+ - 2 items at any given time.
3. The differences between encoding, storage, and retrieval are important.
4. Models of LTM deal with how we organize information that we need to know.
5. Problem solving involves applying what we know in an organized way to issues that we face.
6. Language is a complex system of communication that allows us to use complex symbols to talk about things in the past or future, not just the present.

Essential Questions:
1. Explain the Theory - Model of Information Processing (Atkinson-Shiffrin).  
2. How does encoding, storage, and retrieval work in the memory process?
3. Explain the functions and processing of the brain when remembering.
4. What 4 key methods of problem solving does psychology focus on and compare each process.
5. How do humans learn language acquisition?


Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Article - prep to turn it in: How Friends Ruin Memory.
2. Discuss Article in Socratic Groups: Do Friends Really Ruin Memory?
3. Introduction to Unit 4: Cognition.
4. The Amazing: Superior Autobiographical Memory
5. How To Write the FRQ in AP Psychology; Discuss Take Home FRQ
Remember: FRQ Essay take home due on Monday, Oct. 27

Assignments:

Check the notes, YouTube lectures, and work on the Target Sheets to prepare
FRQ Essay take home due on Monday, Oct. 27
Superior Autobiographical Memory - amazing.
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Friday, Oct. 24, 2014
Quote: "I am learning all the time.  The tombstone will be my diploma."  - Eartha Kitt

Learning Targets:
1. Cognition is the study of mental processes.
2. STM seems to be limited to 7+ - 2 items at any given time.
3. The differences between encoding, storage, and retrieval are important.
4. Models of LTM deal with how we organize information that we need to know.
5. Problem solving involves applying what we know in an organized way to issues that we face.
6. Language is a complex system of communication that allows us to use complex symbols to talk about things in the past or future, not just the present.

Essential Questions:
1. Explain the Theory - Model of Information Processing (Atkinson-Shiffrin).  
2. How does encoding, storage, and retrieval work in the memory process?
3. Explain the functions and processing of the brain when remembering.
4. What 4 key methods of problem solving does psychology focus on and compare each process.
5. How do humans learn language acquisition?


Agenda:
1. DO NOW: How do Superior Autobiographical Memory subjects do it? How can they remember so much of their own lives?
2. Notes, Video, Discussion: Finish Superior Autobiographical Memory; Short-term, Long-term Memory and how it works.
if time....
3. Notes, Video, Discussion: Introduce Language & Thought Introduction

Assignments:

Check the notes, YouTube lectures, and work on the Target Sheets to prepare
FRQ Essay take home due on Monday, Oct. 27

Agenda: Week of Oct 13 - Oct 17, 2014

Advanced Placement Psychology with Mr. Duez
Unit 3 - Consciousness & Learning
Week at a Glance:
MON - No School - "Indigenous Americans Day" link
TUE - Consciousness: Sleep - cycles, disorders, & dreams. What is consciousness? Sleep cycles, disorders, & impact of drugs on consciousness.
WED/TH - Finish Consciousness; Learning: Classical Conditioning: Pavlov, Thorndike, Watson
FRI - Learning: Operant Conditioning (Compared to Classical); Schedules of Reinforcement
============================================================
Monday, Oct 13, 2013 - NO SCHOOL

Schedule this Week:
WEDNESDAY:
Testing: 7:25 – 10:59
2nd Pd: 11:06 – 12:05 (ADA 11:10)
4th Pd: 12:13 - 1:37 -- Lunch B 12:37 – 1:05
6th Pd: 1:44 – 2:45
THURSDAY:
All Students normal Thursday Late Arrival
1st Pd: 9:25 – 10:25
3rd Pd: 10:32 – 11:32 (ADA 10:50)
5th Pd: 11:40 – 1:07 -- Lunch B 12:05 – 12:34 
7th Pd 1:14 – 2:45

Yeah, kinda like that.
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Tuesday, Oct 14, 2014
Quote"Advice is what we ask for when we already know the answer but wish we didn't." - Erica Jong

Learning Targets:
★ People dream during REM sleep.
★ Sleep is not easy for everyone. There are a variety of sleep disorders that are important to understand.
★ The stages of sleep.
★ Impact of drugs on consciousness.


Essential Questions:
● Explain Levels of consciousness. Compare the different levels of consciousness.
● Why do we Sleep and dream?
● Be able to examine and differentiate between different types of sleep disorders
● Define, differentiate and compare the different types of Psychoactive drugs - Depressants, Narcotics, Stimulants, Hallucinogens

Agenda:
1. Do Now - How do drugs impact consciousness? (Psychoactive, Depressants, Stimulants, Hallucinogens)
2. Notes, Discussion, Video: Sleep. Cycles, Disorders, Impact.
Why do we sleep?
Sleep cycles: 5 stages 1, 2, 3&4, and REM. (not in that order necessarily)
Impact of sleep deprivation, sleep disorders.
3. VIDEOThe Story of Peter TrippDisc Jokey be "Trippin'" - What impact did going 8 days and nights w/o sleep have on him?
Quick discussion on "Dreams" - we will not spend a great deal of time on dreams in class - it is not a big part of the AP Test. But, it is interesting!
Does this 'ring a bell'?
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Wednesday, Oct 15 & Thursday, Oct 16, 2014
Quote"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." - Jimi Hendrix

Learning Targets:
1. Learning refers to a relatively permanent change in behavior based on experience.
2. Classical conditioning involves the pairing of one stimulus with another, so that eventually the first neutral stimulus will evoke a reflex.
3. Classical conditioning is associated with Pavlov and WatsonOperant conditioning is associated with Skinner.
4. According to Operant Conditioning, the consequences of a behavior influence whether or not the behavior will be performed again.
5. Reinforcements are used to increase the likelihood a behavior will be repeated
6. Punishments are used to decrease the likelihood a behavior will be repeated.


Essential Questions:

Compare Classical Conditioning and Operant Conditioning.
What is the difference between a reinforcement and punishment?
How do positive and negative types of reinforcement and punishment differ from one another?


Agenda:
1. DO NOW: How do people in psychology look at 'learning' - what do they mean by the term?
2. Notes, Discussion, Video: Classical Conditioning.
Pavlov to Watson to Skinner.
Baby Albert
Understand - UCS - UCR - NS - CS - CR
Create a classical conditioning experiment in groups.
3. Notes, Discussion, Video: Operant Conditioning.
How is Classical Conditioning different from Operant Conditioning?
Pavlov - Dogs
Watson - Baby Albert
Thorndike - Cats
Skinner - Rats
Shaping, Reinforcement, Schedules of Conditioning
If this was a dream of yours? What might it mean? Find Inspiration. Explore.
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Friday, Oct 17, 2014
Quote: "You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life." - Winston Churchill

Learning Targets:
1. Learning refers to a relatively permanent change in behavior based on experience.
2. Classical conditioning involves the pairing of one stimulus with another, so that eventually the first neutral stimulus will evoke a reflex.
3. Classical conditioning is associated with Pavlov and WatsonOperant conditioning is associated with Skinner.
4. According to Operant Conditioning, the consequences of a behavior influence whether or not the behavior will be performed again.
5. Reinforcements are used to increase the likelihood a behavior will be repeated
6. Punishments are used to decrease the likelihood a behavior will be repeated.


Essential Questions:

1. Compare Classical Conditioning and Operant Conditioning.
2. What is the difference between a reinforcement and punishment?
3. How do positive and negative types of reinforcement and punishment differ from one another?


Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Design a classical conditioning experiment. 
2. Notes, Discussion, Video: Operant Conditioning.
How is Classical Conditioning different from Operant Conditioning?
Pavlov - Dogs
Watson - Baby Albert
Thorndike - Cats
Skinner - Rats
Shaping, Reinforcement, Schedules of Conditioning

Agenda: Week of Oct 6 - Oct 10, 2014

Advanced Placement Psychology with Mr. Duez
Unit 2 - Biological Bases of Behavior & Sensation/Perception
Then: Unit 3 - Consciousness & Learning
WEEK AT A GLANCE:
MON - Hearing, Taste/Smell, Touch/Pain
TUE - TEST UNIT 2
WED/THU - Intro to Unit 3 - Consciousness & Learning; Sleep & Dreams; FRQ Intro
FRI - Dreams Article Due; Sleep & Dreams
It isn't quite as simple as it seems. :)
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Monday, Oct 6, 2014
Quote“Sometimes you don’t realize your own strength until you come face to face with your greatest weakness.” – Susan Gale

Learning Targets:
1. Perception is the interpretation of sensory information; it relies on experience.
2. The difference between sensation and perception
3. The structure and function of the eye
4. The structure and function of the ear
Sensation and perception are areas that have been of interest to psychologists for most of the history of psychology. As we sit here, our senses receive literally thousands of messages. We need to make sense of this information. Our senses take in the information, and they do so from birth. Yet the interpretive part -perception- requires knowledge.

Essential Questions:
* How do we convert light into images?
* How does the ear responds to sound waves?
* How do we taste or smell?
* How does the somatic sensory system function?


Agenda:
1. DO NOW: If a tree falls in the woods and no one is there to hear it when it falls... does it make a sound? 
2. Notes, Discussion, & Video: Hearing, Taste/Smell, Touch/Pain.
3. Review Unit 2 ~ Test Tomorrow.

Assignments:

Test for Unit 2 is Tuesday, Tomorrow!
Check the notes, YouTube lectures, and work on the Target Sheets to prepare
That's my boy... Gryffindor. Gryffa-Gryff. Gryff for short.
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Tuesday, Oct 7, 2014
Quote: “Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, “I will try again tomorrow.” - Mary Anne Radmacher

Learning Targets:
1. Perception is the interpretation of sensory information; it relies on experience.
2. The difference between sensation and perception
3. The structure and function of the eye
4. The structure and function of the ear
Sensation and perception are areas that have been of interest to psychologists for most of the history of psychology. As we sit here, our senses receive literally thousands of messages. We need to make sense of this information. Our senses take in the information, and they do so from birth. Yet the interpretive part -perception- requires knowledge.

Essential Questions:
* How do we convert light into images?
* How does the ear responds to sound waves?
* How do we taste or smell?
* How does the somatic sensory system function?


Agenda:

1. DO NOW: Prep for the Test, need a pencil sharpened. Desk empty.
2. TEST UNIT 2: Biological Bases of Behavior & Sensation and Perception

Assignments:
Test for Unit 2 is Wed/Thu, Oct 9/10
Check the notes, YouTube lectures, and work on the Target Sheets to prepare
Be careful. Those ear buds are not your buds! If you hear what I'm saying, which you may not!
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Wednesday, Oct 8, 2014 and Thursday, Oct 9, 2014
Quote“You have power over your mind – not outside events. Realize this, and you will find strength.”- Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Learning Targets:
1. People dream during REM sleep.
2. Sleep isn't easy for everyone. There are a variety of sleep disorders that are important to understand.
3. The Stages of Sleep.
4. Impact of drugs on consciousness.

Essential Questions:
● Explain Levels of consciousness. Compare the different levels of consciousness.
● Why do we Sleep and dream?
● Be able to examine and differentiate between different types of sleep disorders
● Define, differentiate and compare the different types of Psychoactive drugs - Depressants, Narcotics, Stimulants, Hallucinogens
● Does Hypnosis actually work?
● Meditation - is it useful?
● Impact of psychoactive drugs - Depressants, Narcotics, Stimulants, Hallucinogens


Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Pick up the article - "What Dreams are Made Of" - this is due on Friday. You will have the first 15 minutes to get it started in class. 
2. Notes & Discussion:  Stages of Sleep and Sleep Disorders
3. Which theory of dreaming do you subscribe to?
Freud: Dreams as wish fulfillment - The day residue shapes dreams that satisfy unconscious needs in a disguised fashion.
Cartwright: The problem-solving view - We mull over major problems in our lives with reduced logical constraints.
Hobson: Activation-synthesis model - The cortex constructs a story to make sense of internal signals from lower brain centers.
4. Hypnosis: The myths and reality. What can hypnosis tell us about consciousness?
5. Drugs: How do drugs impact consciousness?


Assignments:
Check the notes, YouTube lectures, and work on the Target Sheets to prepare
Sometimes we day dream. Maybe we are rehearsing. Maybe we are just needing a break. :)
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Friday, Oct 10, 2014
Quote: "Don't judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant." - Robert Louis Stevenson

Learning Targets:
1. People dream during REM sleep.
2. Sleep isn't easy for everyone. There are a variety of sleep disorders that are important to understand.
3. The Stages of Sleep.
4. Impact of drugs on consciousness.

Essential Questions:
● Explain Levels of consciousness. Compare the different levels of consciousness.
● Why do we Sleep and dream?
● Be able to examine and differentiate between different types of sleep disorders
● Define, differentiate and compare the different types of Psychoactive drugs - Depressants, Narcotics, Stimulants, Hallucinogens
● Does Hypnosis actually work?
● Meditation - is it useful?
● Impact of psychoactive drugs - Depressants, Narcotics, Stimulants, Hallucinogens


Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Prep article to turn in to Mr. Duez What Dreams are Made Of 
~ Also consider these questions: 
How many hours can a person go without sleep? 
What happens if you are sleep deprived? 
Can you catch up on sleep if you just sleep more the next night after insomnia?
2. Notes & Discussion:  Stages of Sleep and Sleep Disorders
3. Video: He be Tripp'in: The story of Peter Tripp. The Secrets of Sleep Deprivation.

Assignments:
Quiz is Next Friday
Check the notes, YouTube lectures, and work on the Target Sheets to prepare.