Agenda: Unit 5 and 6 - Nov. 5 - Nov. 9, 2012

Unit 5: Intelligence, Motivation, and Emotion
and
Unit 6: Development and Personality
Week at a Glance:
MON - Finish Motivation and introduce Emotion
TUE - Emotion & Reading Check Quiz - Motivation & Emotion
W/TH - TEST Unit 6: Intelligence, Motivation, & Emotion
FRI - Introduction to Unit 6: Development & Personality
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Monday, November 5, 2012
Quote of the Day“Don’t wish it were easier, wish you were better. Don’t wish for fewer problems, wish for more skills. Don’t wish for less challenges, wish for more wisdom.” - Earl Shoaf


Learning Targets:
A behavior is what we do. Motivation is why we do it. Motivation is a complex combination of needs, drives, incentives, and emotions. 
Emotion involves physiological processes, expressive behaviors, and cognitive appraisal in generating feelings. The basic emotions of joy, anger, fear, and sorrow appear to be universal across cultures. Emotions may play an important role in cognitive functions such as reason and decision making.
1. Human motivation is complex, and while there are a number of theories, none by itself sufficiently explains our behavior.
2. Biological motivation includes the role of the hypothalamus, which maintains a state called homeostasis.
3. Theories of social motivation, including the need for achievement and the hierarchy of needs, show the importance of understanding motivation in the context of our environments.
4. Emotions can be explained through a variety of theoretical perspectives, each arguing that emotion emerges in conjunction with physiological response to stimuli.

Essential Questions:

- How and why people are motivated?
- Analyze the different types of motivation.
- Define the importance characteristics of emotion in human behavior and decision making
We do not know how emotions are generalized. 
Which theory is clearest example in your mind?

James-Lange Theory: We have a psychological response and we label it as an emotion:
"I see a bear, my muscles tense, I feel afraid."
Cannon-Bard Theory: We have an emotional response and we feel the physiological response:
"I see a bear, I feel afraid, my muscles tense."
Schacter-Singer Theory: We experience feelings and then label them:
"I feel bad. I must be scared."
Cognitive Appraisal: When there is no physiological arousal, we experience something; we think about it, we label it as an emotion.

Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: How does your biology impact motivation?
2. Notes, Video, Discussion: Motivation.
3. Introduce Emotion and the 4 theories of Emotion.
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Tuesday, November 6, 2012
Quote of the Day“Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.” - Waldo Emerson


Learning Targets:
A behavior is what we do. Motivation is why we do it. Motivation is a complex combination of needs, drives, incentives, and emotions. 
Emotion involves physiological processes, expressive behaviors, and cognitive appraisal in generating feelings. The basic emotions of joy, anger, fear, and sorrow appear to be universal across cultures. Emotions may play an important role in cognitive functions such as reason and decision making.
1. Human motivation is complex, and while there are a number of theories, none by itself sufficiently explains our behavior.
2. Biological motivation includes the role of the hypothalamus, which maintains a state called homeostasis.
3. Theories of social motivation, including the need for achievement and the hierarchy of needs, show the importance of understanding motivation in the context of our environments.
4. Emotions can be explained through a variety of theoretical perspectives, each arguing that emotion emerges in conjunction with physiological response to stimuli.

Essential Questions:

- How and why people are motivated?
- Analyze the different types of motivation.
- Define the importance characteristics of emotion in human behavior and decision making
We do not know how emotions are generalized. 
Which theory is clearest example in your mind?

James-Lange Theory: We have a psychological response and we label it as an emotion:
"I see a bear, my muscles tense, I feel afraid."
Cannon-Bard Theory: We have an emotional response and we feel the physiological response:
"I see a bear, I feel afraid, my muscles tense."
Schacter-Singer Theory: We experience feelings and then label them:
"I feel bad. I must be scared."
Cognitive Appraisal: When there is no physiological arousal, we experience something; we think about it, we label it as an emotion.

Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: Which theory of emotion seems to make the most sense to you? Why?
2. Notes & Discussion - Emotion.
3. Quiz Motivation & Emotion.
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Wednesday, November 7, 2012 -or- Thursday, November 8, 2012
Quote of the Day“An excuse is worse and more terrible than a lie, for an excuse is a lie guarded.” - Pope John Paul I

Development Learning Targets
Early Development:
  • A baby’s beginnings
  • How a child develops physically, cognitively, socially, and emotionally
  • The influences of friends and family
Adolescence:
  • How adolescence is defined across cultures
  • The biological and cognitive development that sets the stage for psychological changes
  • The social context in which adolescents develop
  • Challenges and possible crises facing adolescents today
Adulthood and Aging:
  • The stages of adulthood
  • Physiological and cognitive changes in adulthood
  • Concerns related to aging


Agenda:
1. TEST: Unit 5 - Intelligence, Motivation, & Emotion.
2. After the test, students can pick up the extra credit article (due on Monday in class).
3. Also the take home test for Unit 6 - Development & Personality. Take home test is due next Friday. We will discuss Development & Personality on Friday and throughout the next week. Prepare for the test by viewing the notes online, the learning target sheet, and also by asking questions during class discussion.
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Friday, November 9, 2012
Quote of the Day“The test we must set for ourselves is not to march alone but to march in such a way that others wish to join us.” - Hubert Humphrey


Development Learning Targets
Early Development:
A baby’s beginnings
How a child develops physically, cognitively, socially, and emotionally
The influences of friends and family

Adolescence:
How adolescence is defined across cultures
The biological and cognitive development that sets the stage for psychological changes
The social context in which adolescents develop
Challenges and possible crises facing adolescents today

Adulthood and Aging:
The stages of adulthood
Physiological and cognitive changes in adulthood
Concerns related to aging

Essential Questions:
- Analyze the milestone of a child's development. How does a human being accumulate the skills and abilities needed to survive in a very complex world?

Agenda:
1. Video on Child Development features researcher Judy Deloache on Symbolic Reasoning. Describes how children's recognition of scale models as representations reflects development of symbolic reasoning.
2. Notes & Discussion on Child Development.

Quiz on Development will be next Wednesday/Thursday. 
Take home test over Development & Personality is due Next Friday (day before Fall Break!)