Agenda: Sept 2 - Sept 6, 2013

Advanced Placement Psychology with Mr. Duez
Unit 1 - Evolution of Psych, Research Methods, & Personality
Week at a Glance:
MON - LABOR DAY - No School. YES!
TUE - Review Psych Approaches, PsychTrek Research, Science of Attraction
WED/THU - Science of Attraction, PsychTrek Research, Group Experimentation
FRI - Science of Attraction, Descriptive Statistics Computation Sheet, Research Methods Review
__________________________________________
Monday, September 2, 2013 - Labor Day! No School!
__________________________________________
Tuesday, September 3, 2013
Quote: "I am a great believer in luck. I find that the harder I work, the more I have of it." - Thomas Jefferson

Learning Targets:
Evolution of Psychology: Psych Approaches
Research: The Scientific Method, Design, Processing, and Ethical Issues.
1. Wilhelm Wundt is credited with being the founder of modern experimental psychology when he founded a lab at the University of Leipzig Germany in 1879.
2. Tichener, Watson, James, and Skinner are all important early psychologists.
3. Understanding the differences between the various approaches or perspectives - behavioral, biological, cognitive, humanistic, psychoanalytic, & sociocultural - is the key to understanding psychology.
4. The modern definition of psychology combines the scientific study of behavior and mental processes in humans and other animals.
5. Observation is the most important aspect of psychological research.
6. Operationalism means to define our variables in the manner in which we are going to measure them.
7. Correlation measures degree of relationship between variables and ranges from -1 to +1. Correlation does NOT imply causation.
8. Experimental, correlational, & descriptive methods all have strengths & weaknesses in describing human behavior.
9. Descriptive statistics describe the data gathered in research, while inferential statistics allow us to draw conclusions about how this data can be generalized to a larger population.
10. Following ethical principles is vitally important in any kind of psychological research.

Essential Questions:
1. What is psychology? 
2. How does psychology impact my every day life?
3. How did psychology evolve as a science?
4. Compare and contrast the various types of approaches of psychology?
5. Explain the nature of psychology as an empirical science. How do psychologists determine results
6. Imagine the implications of a poor psychological experiment that fails to follow ethical principles. What are the ramifications?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Which of the psychological approaches do you believe is the best? Why? Which do you have problems with and why?
2. PsychTrek - Research Methods. Informal & interactive quiz over psych experiments.
3. Science of Attraction - The Halo Effect: Students will investigate the experiment regarding the Halo Effect. Does one aspect of their personality overshadow an inital impression? How good is our ability to judge a person? Is this a proper experiment? Define the operational variables.

Assignment:
Continue to take notes from your text, presentation/video lectures, and psychtrek.
Quiz is next Monday over Unit 1.
Test is next Wed/Thu over Unit 1.
Correlation does not mean causation!
__________________________________________
Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013 & Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013
Quote: "Unless you pay the price for success, you will not know it's worth." - Apoorve Dubey

Learning Targets:
Evolution of Psychology: Psych Approaches
Research: The Scientific Method, Design, Processing, and Ethical Issues.
1. Wilhelm Wundt is credited with being the founder of modern experimental psychology when he founded a lab at the University of Leipzig Germany in 1879.
2. Titchener, Watson, James, and Skinner are all important early psychologists.
3. Understanding the differences between the various approaches or perspectives - behavioral, biological, cognitive, humanistic, psychoanalytic, & sociocultural - is the key to understanding psychology.
4. The modern definition of psychology combines the scientific study of behavior and mental processes in humans and other animals.
5. Observation is the most important aspect of psychological research.
6. Operationalism means to define our variables in the manner in which we are going to measure them.
7. Correlation measures degree of relationship between variables and ranges from -1 to +1. Correlation does NOT imply causation.
8. Experimental, correlational, & descriptive methods all have strengths & weaknesses in describing human behavior.
9. Descriptive statistics describe the data gathered in research, while inferential statistics allow us to draw conclusions about how this data can be generalized to a larger population.
10. Following ethical principles is vitally important in any kind of psychological research.

Essential Questions:
1. What is psychology? 
2. How does psychology impact my every day life?
3. How did psychology evolve as a science?
4. Compare and contrast the various types of approaches of psychology?
5. Explain the nature of psychology as an empirical science. How do psychologists determine results
6. Imagine the implications of a poor psychological experiment that fails to follow ethical principles. What are the ramifications?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Take a moment to create a psychological experiment. Use operational definitions to show how your experiment will work. Hypothesis, variables, groups,
2. PsykTrek - Research Methods, students will be in groups and will compete on the quiz/test within the interactive questioning modules.
3. Group Experimentation - Each group will create one experiment, mark the operational definitions (variables, groups, etc.). Each group will present their idea to the class.
3. Science of Attraction: Sounds of Attraction -- how does our voice represent ourselves? In the modern world we communicate via the telephone more than ever, in many cases with people we have never met. What assumptions do we all make about people's attractiveness based upon their voices?

Assignment:
Continue to take notes from your text, presentation/video lectures, and psychtrek.
Quiz is next Monday over Unit 1.
Test is next Wed/Thu over Unit 1.
How important are ethics in Psychological Experiments?
__________________________________________
Friday, Sept. 6, 2013
Quote: “Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there." - Will Rogers

Learning Targets:
Evolution of Psychology: Psych Approaches
Research: The Scientific Method, Design, Processing, and Ethical Issues.
1. Wilhelm Wundt is credited with being the founder of modern experimental psychology when he founded a lab at the University of Leipzig Germany in 1879.
2. Titchener, Watson, James, and Skinner are all important early psychologists.
3. Understanding the differences between the various approaches or perspectives - behavioral, biological, cognitive, humanistic, psychoanalytic, & sociocultural - is the key to understanding psychology.
4. The modern definition of psychology combines the scientific study of behavior and mental processes in humans and other animals.
5. Observation is the most important aspect of psychological research.
6. Operationalism means to define our variables in the manner in which we are going to measure them.
7. Correlation measures degree of relationship between variables and ranges from -1 to +1. Correlation does NOT imply causation.
8. Experimental, correlational, & descriptive methods all have strengths & weaknesses in describing human behavior.
9. Descriptive statistics describe the data gathered in research, while inferential statistics allow us to draw conclusions about how this data can be generalized to a larger population.
10. Following ethical principles is vitally important in any kind of psychological research.

Essential Questions:
1. What is psychology? 
2. How does psychology impact my every day life?
3. How did psychology evolve as a science?
4. Compare and contrast the various types of approaches of psychology?
5. Explain the nature of psychology as an empirical science. How do psychologists determine results
6. Imagine the implications of a poor psychological experiment that fails to follow ethical principles. What are the ramifications?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: What is the difference between descriptive and inferential statistics? When would you use either in psychology?
2. Statistics for the Terrified! Students will work in groups to convert raw data into formulas. The object is to understand the need to collect data and extrapolate results.
3. Science of Attraction: Smell of Attraction. Science suggests that the smell of a person can influence your attraction to them. It is a scientific fact that we can be biologically disposed to a certain type of person based on their smell. Does their experiment work? If so, why does it? Can you define the operational variables and parts of their experiment and explain it from a scientific viewpoint?

Assignment:
Continue to take notes from your text, presentation/video lectures, and psychtrek.
Monday we will begin to look at Personality and study it on Tuesday as well.
Quiz is next Monday over Unit 1.
Test is next Wed/Thu over Unit 1.